New truck design on the horizon: just add wheels

New truck design on the horizon: just add wheels

Prof. Amir Khajepour stands next to a vehicle containing his new wheel unit.

Vehicles could be affordably produced for a wide variety of specialised purposes using a sophisticated wheel unit developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo, Canada.

The self-contained unit combines a wheel and an electric motor with braking, suspension, steering and a control system in a single module designed to be bolted to any vehicle frame.

It would free manufacturers from making huge investments to develop those components from scratch and enable the economical production of specialised vehicles in even small quantities.

“The idea is modularity and plug-and-play control capability,” said Amir Khajepour, a mechanical and mechatronics engineering professor at Waterloo. “Our wheel unit, in a sense, is a full vehicle with only one wheel. All that’s missing is a body.”

Automotive researchers first applied the concept to electric, two-seater urban cars, which promise to ease congestion and reduce pollution, but make up only a tiny fraction of sales because of high prices, space limitations and safety concerns.

Mass-produced wheel units would significantly reduce production costs whilst also creating space for passengers that would otherwise be devoted to mechanical components such as steering columns.

To improve the stability of the tall, narrow cars, researchers also designed and prototyped the units – which weigh about 40 kilograms and have about 25 horsepower – to enable active wheel cambering, or tilting.

“Companies will be able to produce a smaller car that is cheaper, too,” said Mr Khajepour, director of the Mechatronic Vehicle Systems Lab. “Right now, we are not there. You have to pay more to get a smaller car, to get less.”

The next step in the research involves scaling up the wheel unit, technically called a corner module, for large utility and commercial vehicles.

That would pave the way for more cost-effective production of low-volume, specialised vehicles with customised bodies in fields such as rescue operations.

“It’s an economy of scale problem,” Mr Khajepour said. “Corner modules would allow us, without enormous development costs, to make vehicles that are specific for each application, for each function, by concentrating only on the design of the body and the user interface.”

A paper on the research, Development of a Novel Integrated Corner Module for Narrow Urban Vehicles, was co-authored by Khajepour, former master’s student Mohammad-Amin Rajaie and post-doctoral fellows Alireza Pazooki and Amir Soltani. It first appeared online in Journal of Automobile Engineering in January 2018 and in print on February 1, 2019.

 

MREC HERE

You may also like to read:


, , , ,

Comments are closed.

Newsletter

Sign up with your business email address to keep up with the latest industry news from T&L. Newsletter sent every week.

Most Read

Recycled plastic railway sleepers laid in Victoria
Trains travelling through Richmond in Victoria will now be r...
Caught in the middle: shippers, truckers suffer wharf strikes
Shipping lines are being urged to provide detention relief a...
Spotlight on Promat 2019 – from MHD magazine
Mal Walker In early April I had the opportunity to visit Pr...
Logistics hotspots of skills in demand
The second of Hays’ bi-annual Logistics Job Reports for th...
Join the Network – from MHD magazine
As commerce, in general, has become more competitive and adv...
384kg of cocaine found in excavator worth $144m
The largest ever drug interception operation coordinated by ...

Supported By